Home Diabetes Testing in Steps

Would you stay unsure about your blood glucose?

As the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) advises, you may need to check your own blood glucose on a regular basis to help control your diabetes. It will tell you what your blood glucose is at the time you test. Keep a record of your results and show it to your health care team. Some meters and test strips report blood glucose results as plasma glucose values which are 10 to 15 percent higher than whole blood glucose values. Ask your doctor or pharmacist whether your meter and strips provide whole blood or plasma results.

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The target glucose range for most people using whole blood is 80 to 120 before meals and 100 to 140 at bedtime.

The target glucose range for most people using plasma is 90 to 130 before meals and 110 to 150 at bedtime.

Talk to your health care team about the best ways to check your own blood glucose.
Ask your health care team what your blood glucose targets are before meals, after meals, and at bedtime and write them down.
Ask what to do if your blood glucose is often higher or lower than it should be.
Ask how to get the supplies you need to do the tests. Most insurance companies, including Medicare, now pay for diabetes supplies, such as test strips.

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